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How to bond with your adopted dog

a lady hugging a dog at the pound with the caption How to bond with your adopted dog

There’s no doubt that dogs make great companions, and when you adopt one, you’re opening your home up to endless hours of love and happiness. But getting to that point where your dog is completely comfortable in their new surroundings can take time.

Contents of this article:

  1. How can I get my rescue dog to trust me?
  2. Have realistic expectations for your rescue dog.
  3. What is the 3-3-3 rule when adopting a dog?
    1. 3 days.
    2. 3 weeks.
    3. 3 months.
  4. How to bond with your new rescue dog.
  5. How to bond with your adopted dog.

How can I get my rescue dog to trust me?

Here are a few tips on how to bond with your adopted dog and help them feel at ease in their new home so they can begin to trust you.

Have realistic expectations for your rescue dog.

Getting a new dog is an exciting experience. You’ve likely spent weeks (if not months) researching different breeds, evaluating which one would be the best fit for your family.

But once you’ve finally brought your furry friend home, it’s important to keep your expectations in check. A newly adopted dog is still getting used to their new surroundings, and it will take time for them to truly settle in.

Be patient and give them the space they need to adjust. Dogs are individuals just like people, and they come with their own set of quirks and behaviors. Some may be shy at first, while others may seem playful and friendly right away.

The best way to get to know your new dog is to take things slow and give them time to adjust to their new home. Let them approach you on their own terms, and avoid pushing them too hard to interact with you or other family members.

With a little patience and understanding, you’ll soon form a strong bond with your new furry friend.

What is the 3-3-3 rule when adopting a dog?

The 3-3-3 rule is a guideline to help you understand how your new dog or puppy will adjust to life in your household during the first 3 days, 3 weeks, and 3 months after adopting them.

It may take them 3 days to get used to the new surroundings, 3 weeks to learn your routine, and 3 months to feel comfortable in their new home.

All dogs are individuals and will adjust to their new circumstances at different rates, but the 3-3-3 rule can help you understand what to expect during those first few months.

3 days.

The first 3 days are the decompression period and are critical for your dog to acclimate to its new environment. During this decompression period, it’s best to provide your dog with a safe space where they can feel comfortable and relaxed. This might be a crate or a quiet corner of the room.

Avoid overwhelming your dog with too much stimulation during this time. Too much noise, movement, and activity can be stressful for a dog who is already feeling insecure. Give them time to settle in and get used to their new surroundings before introducing them to the rest of the family.

Your dog may not want to eat or drink, or do much of anything during this time and they may be feeling very insecure, not knowing what’s happening. They may hide themselves away in small places such as behind or under furniture.

By taking things slow during the decompression period, you can help your dog acclimate to their new environment and build a foundation for a happy and healthy life together.

3 weeks.

The next three weeks are crucial for your new dog. This is when they will start to learn your daily routine and begin to become comfortable in their new home. Take things slow and let them get used to their new surroundings a little bit at a time. 

It’s important to be patient and positive with them during this phase. Try not to introduce them to too many new people all at once, since it can be overwhelming for them.

Stick to a regular feeding and potty schedule, and if possible, take them on a short walk each day. You may see brief glimpses of your dog’s personality emerging during this period, and this is a common time for behavior problems to surface.

If you’re having trouble with your dog’s behavior and you don’t know how to deal with any issues, seek out the help of a qualified, professional trainer or behaviorist. They can give you guidance on how to manage them.

3 months.

The third stage is when your dog will start to feel truly comfortable in their new home and routine. By the time your dog has been with you for three months, they should feel more at ease in their new environment.

They will come to trust and bond with you. It is important to continue to provide love and guidance during this time to help your dog continue to settle and feel comfortable.

Remember to be patient and give them time to adjust to their new life. With a little love and understanding, you will soon develop a strong bond with your newly adopted dog.

Following the 3-3-3 rule will help you create a strong bond with your new dog and set them up for a lifetime of happiness.

How to bond with your new rescue dog.

Once you’ve brought your new furry friend home, there are a few things you can do to help them feel comfortable and start bonding with them.

  1. Give them time to decompress. When you first bring your dog home, they may be feeling insecure and need some time to adjust to their new surroundings. It’s important to give them a safe space where they can feel relaxed and let them get used to their new home at their own pace.
  2. Be patient and positive. It may take a few weeks or months for your dog to start feeling comfortable and for their personality to start shining through. During this time, it’s important to be patient and keep a positive attitude. Try not to overwhelm them with too many new people or experiences all at once.
  3. Stick to a regular routine. Having a set routine will help your dog feel more comfortable and settled. Try to keep mealtimes and potty breaks regular, and take them on short walks each day.
  4. Seek professional help if needed. If you’re having trouble with your dog’s behavior, don’t hesitate to reach out to a qualified trainer or behaviorist for guidance.

How to bond with your adopted dog.

By following these tips, you can help your new dog feel comfortable enough to start trusting you. Just remember to be patient and give them time to adjust to their new life.

With a little love and understanding, you will soon develop a strong bond with your newly adopted dog.

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A variety of dog accessories including a bowl of dry dog food, a collar and leash and a ball


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